Born in Salisbury, Rhodesia, Craig Bone was trained as a Graphic Artist at The Natal University in South Africa. In 1973, Craig returned to Rhodesia to perform his National Service in the Rhodesian Light Infantry. During this time, he painted vivid scenes of combat and was totally immersed in the war. Craig was severely wounded by a mortar attack, which almost cost him his legs and his life. Subsequently, Craig turned to painting full time. After gaining recognition as an artist, Craig was honored when his painting, Earth, Wind and Fire, was hung in the Pentagon. An important work, it depicts the reality of the Vietnam War and honors the sacrifice of American soldiers.

Today, Craig dominates the art market as one of the most renowned African wildlife artists. Rendering Africa’s magnificent and awe inspiring wildlife, Craig paints large prowling cats in the jungle and herds of grazing elephants on the savannah. Although he now lives in North Carolina, Craig travels extensively to photograph the animals and gain inspiration for his paintings. In addition to continuing to create his famed wildlife artwork, Craig was recently commissioned to create a portrait of the Zulu King, Goodwill Zwelithini kaBhekuzulu, the reigning king of Zululand.

On the Prowl

On the Prowl
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While pursuing his successful artistic career, Craig fulfills his strong sense of community spirit and his passion for the military. He now supports veterans programs throughout the United States and Zimbabwe. He raised over $100,000 for the Safari Club International Veterans Committee, and in 2003, he was the awarded the Safari Club International Wildlife Artist of the Year. In addition, Craig was honored to participate in the official opening of Fort Bragg’s Airborne and Special Operations Museum in North Carolina.

In recent years, Craig became active in the Art From the Heart program being offered by the American Red Cross at Fort Bragg Airforce Base in North Carolina. This program helps wounded soldiers by providing them the opportunity to draw and paint. In addition to proving a form of art therapy, the program gives the soldiers the skills to potentially make art a second career after transitioning from life in the Army. An important program close to Craig’s heart, he was honored when the American Red Cross bestowed him with the Friends of the American Red Cross Award in 2011, after they had awarded him a Humanitarian Award in 2010. When asked about his reason for volunteering, Craig said, “I want to say thank you to America for allowing me in here because I came from Zimbabwe. Freedom and democracy doesn’t really mean much until you’ve had it taken away from you and that’s what happened to me in Zimbabwe.”

In addition, you may want to view Maxine and Lauren Bone’s works. Both talented and successful artists, they are Craig’s daughters. They were both taught and inspired by their father.

Craig sharing his unique artistic talents with a soldier at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. As a volunteer in the Art from the Heart Program by the American Red Cross, Craig teaches wounded soldiers how to draw and paint, helping them to recover and prepare for the transition into civilian life.

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Double Take

Double Take

Double Take

African Mirror

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African Mirror

Baobab Tree

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Baobab Tree

Hidden Pools

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Hidden Pools

Double Take

Double Take

Double Take

Ghosts of Etosha

Ghosts of Etosha

Ghosts of Etosha